Salt Water Living Room

5238 Old Sudley Rd., West River, MD 20778

I was trying to figure out what could have inspired the… bold color scheme in this living room, then it hit me:

Regal Blue Tang

Okay the living room is basically unbearable unless you happen to be a salt water fish… but they do have a pretty sweet barn.

5238 Old Sudley Rd., West River, MD 20778

So there is that.

About the Author

Marty E.

Naked Loon Editor-in-Chief

20 Comments on "Salt Water Living Room"

  1. Do you know, I stared at the first picture and said to myself, “That is an extraordinary English-country-house room – if you can make yourself look at the actual woodwork under that paint. All the furniture, even the couch (if you ignore the Safety Yellow Slipcover), looks to be either well-chosen reproduction or the real deal – right down to the chaste grandmother’s clock, which, I think I can assure you, did not roll off the assembly line at Herman Miller.

    How did that paint get in this room? Failing eyesight? Dementia? An unwise marriage? All of the above?

    Sweet spirits of camphor, a moment of silence please, for the original stained wood that I fear with all of my being lies under that paint.

    ReplyReply
  2. Denita TwoDragons | December 9, 2012 at 5:13 PM |

    @anodean: *silence*

    Nothing a good sanding and some cream-colored chalk paint won’t fix I hope. Please…I hope….

    ReplyReply
  3. Denita TwoDragons | December 9, 2012 at 5:17 PM |

    I’m sorry, I can’t see a Blue Tang without thinking of Dory from Finding Nemo. Maybe that’s it–the painter had awful short-term memory! “Just keep painting, just keep painting…”

    ReplyReply
  4. Not salt *water* Marty, salthawk. Obviously the current owner is an alumnus of the high school here in my town, whose mascot is the salthawk and whose school colors are royal blue and yellow gold. Add in the reds in the Persian carpet and it’s likely s/he also attended my alma mater, the University of Kansas. I’d never thought of it before, but I suppose the salthawk and the Jayhawk could be related species. ;)

    http://www.prepsportswear.com/product/us/Kansas/Hutchinson/Hutchinson-High-School-Salthawks/Men-s-Tech-Fleece-Sweatshirt.aspx?schoolid=180096&productid=4227&pc=true_royal_white&category=197&d=7800&up_ss2=m

    http://www.ku.edu/about/traditions/jayhawk.shtml

    ReplyReply
  5. @anodean: *silence*

    Silence especially after reading this at the listing:

    “One of the finest equestrian properties in the Chesapeake Bay region, the 17th century manor features original paneling, 12 ft ceilings, and walk-in fireplaces.”

    Maybe they’re trying to scare away any ghosts? God knows there were no wall colors like those back in their day…

    ReplyReply
  6. @Emerald63: Geez, I keep forgetting stuff…

    The listing also says, “meticulously restored and updated.” I’m thinking you can have one or the other but not both, not if updated means Freakin.NEON.Colors.

    ReplyReply
  7. @Denita TwoDragons: I’m not so sure on fixing this day-glo debacle. Unless they sealed the wood before painting, I have to think at least some of those colors are going to leave a shadow.

    And sanding? Oooh…. the folks at Antiques Roadshow would not be happy about that!

    ReplyReply
  8. @Emerald63: *more silence*

    Dear Lord, I didn’t have the courage to go look at the actual listing – and I still don’t. It really is a centuries-old English country house? What did they do, marry double first cousins all this time?

    I am reminded of a collector who, in the face of yet another story of yet another treasure having been destroyed or discarded, said, “That’s what makes the rest of them valuable.”

    *sigh*

    ReplyReply
  9. @anodean: LOL on your quote!

    Actually, the house is in Maryland. It’s only in the style of an English country house.

    Oh, and hubby is telling me that the colors are likely for an Annapolis alum. The listing mentions being close and he says those are the school colors for the naval academy.

    ReplyReply
  10. You don’t understand – “17th Century” was before the American Revolution. That was an English country house, built the same way as contemporary structures back in the old country… aw, that hurts.

    ReplyReply
  11. (Whoopsie on the italics, there. Sorry.)

    ReplyReply
  12. @anodean: S’kay, but do tell – how can I make italics? It can’t be that hard if you did it by accident! I’d also love to be able to do bold…

    ReplyReply
  13. @Emerald63: You have to do it the hard way, by putting in your own html code to start and stop them. Begin with a less-than-sign (points left), followed by “i”, followed by greater-than-sign (points right). Italics will ensue. To end them, use less-than-sign (points left), followed by a “/i” (regular slash, not the goofy one), followed by greater-than-sign.

    I think bold used to use “b”, but I’ve gone foggy on that one… happy fumble-fingering. :D

    ReplyReply
  14. Denita TwoDragons | December 15, 2012 at 10:07 AM |

    So let me see… this is italics and this is boldface

    ReplyReply
  15. Denita TwoDragons | December 15, 2012 at 10:07 AM |

    Yay!! It worked!! Whoohoo!!

    ReplyReply
  16. … and so it began. :D

    (hee hee!)

    ReplyReply
  17. @Denita TwoDragons: Thanks, D!!!

    ReplyReply
  18. Okay, reading along, ha! Look at that paint! Good choice, Marty… *SCREECH* (those were my brakes) Hold everything a moment….

    “Walk-in fireplaces”??????

    “Yes, I saw Shadrach, Meschach, and Abednego, but who was that fourth person in there with them?”

    ReplyReply
  19. @JMixx: Walk-in fireplaces weren’t uncommon back then. Why? Say you’ve got an enormous cauldron of something to put over the cooking fire or a whole hog to put on a spit. It’s gonna be way easier to do that if you can walk into the fireplace. Trying to lean over and maneuver something that heavy is at best cumbersome and at worst a back breaker. Also leaves tons of room for a nice big Yule log during the holidays! :D

    ReplyReply

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*